Great British Railway Journeys

Series 7
30:00

Series 7, Episode 4 - St Helens to Knutsford

4.0 0 x
Michael Portillo travels from St Helens to Knutsford, learning about glass-making and how Victorian building techniques have evolved.
30:00

Series 7, Episode 3 - Preston to Swinton

4.0 0 x
Michael Portillo journeys from Preston to Swinton, discovering the poetry of Edwin Waugh and twisting his tongue around the Lancashire dialect.
30:00

Series 7, Episode 2 - Windermere to Carnforth

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo continues through the Lake District, learning about the legacy of author Beatrix Potter, and finishes with a brief encounter at Carnforth.
30:00

Series 7, Episode 1 - Carlisle to Penrith

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo learns more about the country's railways, setting off from Carlisle on the first leg of a journey through north-west England.
Series 6
30:00

Series 6, Episode 20 - Oakham to Cambridge

4.0 0 x
Michael Portillo travels from Oakham to Cambridge, finding out why Stamford is a popular location for period dramas and examining Charles Darwin's student days.
30:00

Series 6, Episode 19 - Oxford to Luton

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo visits Oxford University's Bodleian library to see Victorian treasures including Mary Shelley's Frankenstein manuscript.
30:00

Series 6, Episode 18 - Abergavenny to Hanborough

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo visits Big Pit coal mine in Blaenavon and learns about 19th-century developments in angling.
30:00

Series 6, Episode 17 - Swansea to Hereford

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo begins in the ruinous gardens at Aberglasney House near Llandeilo and finishes this leg of his journey at a traditional cider house in Hereford.
Series 4
30:00

Series 4, Episode 8 - London Victoria to Abbey Wood

3.0 0 x
Michael Portillo learns about the drinking habits of volunteer Victorian firefighters and learns 19th-century sewage pumps were a marvel of design.
30:00

Series 4, Episode 7 - Woking to Clapham Junction

4.0 0 x
Michael Portillo travels from Woking to Clapham Junction, trying his hand at croquet and discovering a surprising 19th-century place of worship.
Archive