Food Unwrapped

Last episode
35:00
Food Unwrapped

A trip to California reveals the secret to perfect walnuts. Matt Tebbutt finds out what makes sour sweets sour. And how do brewers make their trendy hazy beers cloudy? (S18 Ep2)

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Series 8
30:00
How do raspberries get from the field to our fridges without turning to mush? Why is Thai banana blossom shaking up fish and chips? Plus: an eye-watering trip to an onion factory. (S19 Ep2)
30:00
Jimmy Doherty investigates microplastics in some of our most popular soft drinks. Kate Quilton tackles nettles. Amanda Byram asks: why do rhubarb and custard go so well together? (S19 Ep5)
30:00
What's the most nutritious lettuce in a salad bag? Is sea salt all it's cracked up to be? And in Suffolk, Briony May Williams explores the difference between light and dark ales. (S20 Ep3)
30:00
The team investigate how instant cappuccino gets its froth. Why do most tinned tomatoes come from Italy? And an odyssey across Europe reveals how fluffy panettone lasts so long. (S19 Ep1)
30:00
Jimmy Doherty finds out what the white skin on Brie is made from. Helen Lawal explores how candy floss is inspiring a food revolution. Briony May Williams goes crayfish trapping. (S19 Ep4)
30:00
How can there be so many tomatoes in a tomato ketchup bottle? When did oysters go from Victorian bar snack to luxury food? Plus: the truth about medium vs large eggs. (S18 Ep3)
35:00
Why do baguettes go stale faster than a sliced loaf? Why is buffalo mozzarella much more expensive than cow mozzarella? And the surprising secret to how mushy peas get mushed. (S18 Ep1)
Series 12
30:00
Some favourite investigations. Jimmy Doherty looks at how squid and chips could become our national dish. Kate Quilton reports on kangaroo meat. Matt Tebbutt investigates pesto. (S17 Ep3)
35:00
What gives fizzy sweets their fizz, and can you harness their explosive power in a rocket? One in five of us lack vitamin D: can mushrooms help? And are breakfast smoothies safe? (S15 Ep8)
35:00
Can coffee help you sober up? Kate investigates trendy drink kombucha and meets people who are turning it into clothes! And which cut of beef do thin-cut steaks come from? (S14 Ep6)
35:00
Since the sugar tax was introduced, manufacturers have been putting less sugar in some of our favourite brands. But what are they adding instead? Plus: sliced bread, and chicken. (S14 Ep5)
35:00
Kate meets a tech start-up who hope to feed the world by growing fish flesh in a dish. Plus: how do you make ice cubes that aren't cloudy? And why can't you put papaya in jelly? (S14 Ep4)
30:00
In China, Matt Tebbutt helps to cultivate pearls from surprising creatures. And why does sliced ham sometimes have a weird rainbow pattern on it? (S14 Ep3)
30:00
Could a threat to British juniper berries spell the end of the gin resurgence? Kate checks out macadamia nuts, and Matt finds out what's so bad about his double-dipping habit. (S14 Ep2)
35:00
Kate Quilton looks into Britain's plastic crisis, while Jimmy Doherty and Matt Tebbutt visit South Africa on a piquanté pepper hunt. (S14 Ep1)
30:00
What's that white powdery stuff that sometimes forms on chocolate? Can bedtime teas really help us sleep? And were Edam cheese balls really once used as cannonballs? (S13 Ep6/6)
30:00
Are baby carrots really babies? Why are some vanilla ice creams more expensive than others? How can coffees have lots of flavours when they use just two types of coffee beans? (S13 Ep5/6)
30:00
Jimmy hunts for the mother of all lagers. Kate finds out if changing the shape of food helps kids eat their vegetables. And why are blueberries coated in a strange cloudy wax? (S13 Ep4/6)
30:00
Jimmy finds out how shredded wheat is made. Matt discovers that lard can be more nutritious than butter. Dr Helen visits Poland to learn the trick to concentrating apple juice. (S13 Ep3/6)
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